revivolution

The Revivolution Will Be Televised

27 May of 2014

By: Nombuso Nkambule (@hrh_nombuso)

The Revivolution rappers have a style that is relatable to the lifestyle of this generation, but still reminiscent of the era of KRS-One and Wu-Tang. This sound garnered attention in the Sprite Obey You Collective: South Africa, through Tony Dangler’s single, ‘No Manners’.

Johannesburg based hip hop collective, Revivolution, make music that has a distinctive ‘boom bap’ sound to it. However, according to group members, Tony Dangler and Tommy Ills, ‘boom bap’ is more of an influencer of their music than the definitive genre of their music. The Revivolution rappers have a style that is relatable to the lifestyle of this generation, but still reminiscent of the era of KRS-One and Wu-Tang. This sound garnered attention in the Sprite Obey You Collective: South Africa, through Tony Dangler’s single, ‘No Manners’.

Tony, you made your mark in the Sprite Obey You Collective, what has that experience done for you?

Tony Dangler: The Obey You Sprite Uncontainable Experience has been one of the biggest successes in my life. I literally went from being nobody to being somebody worth working with in the game. The opportunities that have arisen from this experience range from getting to be closer in contact with the industry players, to doing features with some industry names.

‘No Manners’ saw a collaboration with Christian Tiger School producer, Dessert Head. What inspired the track?

Tony Dangler: ‘No Manners’ was composed and produced in Cape Town alongside Dessert Head. It was inspired by the gap that exists between myself and the artists who are “made” in the industry, and it also manages to capture what it has taken to for a guy like me to reach the point I’m at right now.

Revivolution’s music has a boom bap sound to it, what’s the current relevance of that 80s and 90s sound?

Tommy Ills: The name ‘Revivo’ says it all. I’d rather not be classified as strictly boom bap because my love for music stems deeper than a singular sound of hip-hop. Yes, I am very influenced by 80s and 90s rap music, so keeping the sound alive is important in order to maintain the cultures identity, even in a new age.

You’d rather not be classified as a strictly ‘boom bap’ artist, why not?

Tommy Ills: For me the phrase ‘boom bap’ is nothing more than a description or feel to a certain sound of rap now. It no longer represents the specific lifestyle (of the 80s and 90s). So in that sense, it has evolved and is now more appealing and commercially viable.

Watch the video for Tommy Ills single shot in Cape Town, ‘See You Later‘. Ills says of this video, “See You Later is basically a song about being ‘slept on’ by a girl, only for the same girl to fall for you, but it’s too late.”

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